Is It Smart To Buy A Fixer-Upper As Your First Home?

Buying your first home can be very exciting. Among all the decisions you’ll have to make when you seek that home is whether you want to buy one that’s ready to move into and live in as is, or one that needs a little work. Many people buy fixer-uppers because of the lower cost, but sometimes those kinds of homes can end up costing you a lot more in the long run. Here are some things to consider when you’re trying to decide whether it’s smart for you to buy a fixer-upper or not.

1. What can you get in your price range?

Many first-time homebuyers are on tight budgets. They don’t have a lot of money to spend, and they want to live in a good area. Overall, location is more important than the house, because the house can be changed. If you can’t get into a good area without buying a fixer-upper, it may be worth considering. Just be sure you’re really buying in a location you like and one that you want to remain in for a while so you can get the best deal and turn your house into a solid investment. Look at several houses, both fixer-uppers and finished, before deciding.

2. How handy are you, really?

There’s a big difference between painting a room and fixing that plumbing leak. When you’re considering a fixer-upper for your first home, make sure you’re honest about your skill level. Don’t buy into more than you can fix, or than you can afford to have fixed. By getting a good, thorough home inspection, you’ll have a better idea of what kinds of improvements really need to be made. That can help you make the right decision based on the work you’re able to do on the home.

3. How much savings do you have to use for repairs?

Repair budgets rarely get adjusted downward. Typically, it will cost more than you expect to repair a home. Even if you have plenty of savings, it’s a good idea to get some repair estimates before committing to buying. That way, you’ll have realistic numbers you can look at when you’re trying to decide if that home is the right one for you. Surprise expenses can still crop up, but there will be fewer of them to contend with.

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